Lifting Plate at 830°C

I'm working on a strange case: a plate is welded to a heavy shaft (6,2t) and it is submitted to a quencing cycle with the shaft.
So the shaft must be lifted at 830°C after the heating cycle (about 12 hours).
I would perform contact analysis between hook and plate hole considering the plate material elastic-plastic and hook material elastic (room temperature parameters)
Some ideas about contact parameters? Elastic modulud of structural steel at 830°C decreases until 17000 MPa.

Thanks

Comments

  • Plate-hook assembly
    LiftingPlate.jpg
    547 x 640 - 52K
  • edited July 28
    I'm working in a similar problem, a table to support some assemblies that will be under thermal release stress treatment at 730 degrees. One thing that could be a problem is also creep, at high temperatures could be significant. We are constrained as the furnace can't support a lot of load, so we must make a light structure.

    About contact parameters, maybe you should try with the similar values as for normal temperature, and maybe decrease a little as the stiffness of the structure and E has decreased also. The more higher the contact parameters will need more iterations but less penetration on the model. Also if you add friction would be a help to the solver.

    Yesterday I worked with a rubber bumper with insanne contacts and play a little with those values, will try to upload some pictures later.

    Best regards
  • By the way the creep will be present if the hook is stressed at temperature for long time, in your case maybe would be outside of the furnace so won´t be affected.
  • During heating cycle the plate is unladed. The lifting cycle is short (5 10 min) so I exclude creep. Hook is a commercial component by Crosby and it doesn't undergoes heating cycle.
    Euronorm give a 33 MPa Yiled stress for S355 at 830°C
  • edited October 26
    Today the lifting of 6,2t shaft at 830°C without problems
    Quencing.jpg
    353 x 441 - 41K
    Quencing-2.jpg
    623 x 637 - 236K
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