Examine Stress Section Through Model

I'm performing a simple linear load/displacement/stress study on an eye bolt.

I wish to extract data at a plane fixed relative to the coordinate system, i.e. this simulates the wall that the bolt is fixed to.

Thanks for any help.

Comments

  • To view the interior stress, use the Cutting plane slider at the top-right of the toolbar.

    To get the data in table form, you'd have to align some nodes into the plane you want before solving. You can then make a node selection of them and that'll appear as an option in the Table in the solution.
  • Thanks Victor, having a play now, is there a way to quantify the location of the cut plane? I presume at the moment it jumps node to node, so you'd need a set of nodes at the desired distance for the tool to 'get a fix on'.

    How would you go about doing this?

    Also well done and thank you for this software, it really hits the sweet spot of price and usability, I like the personal touch with support too, keep it up dude.
  • Pretty much, yes, like you say.

    If you're repeatedly looking at the same plane, you could use two different components then you can make one invisible in the postprocessor.
  • edited July 27
    Another option would be making a volume division on the geometry using Salome, then join both and make a mesh on that joined geometry, to have a continuos mesh but divided exactly where you need the plane with coincident nodes. Then you can export as UNV and open in Mecway to complete the model, and as Victor says, you can make every side as as component to hide/show easily.

    Is possible to add this feature (mesh with coincident nodes for adjacent surfaces) in the future?

    Regards
  • Would I have to make a bonded contact between the two components? I'll test this at some point after work.
  • If you use coincident mesh (made it on Salome) there is no need to bond as they share nodes.
  • Where do you learn how to use salome?
  • I agree. It would be useful having numeric value display for cutting plane to quantify the position
Sign In or Register to comment.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!